Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Dynamic FirmThe Role of Technology, Strategy, Organization, and Regions$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Alfred D. Chandler, Peter Hagstrom, and Örjan Sölvell

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780198296041

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0198296045.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 18 June 2019

Learning How to Govern and Learning How to Solve Problems: On the Co‐Evolution of Competences, Conflicts and Organizational Routines *

Learning How to Govern and Learning How to Solve Problems: On the Co‐Evolution of Competences, Conflicts and Organizational Routines *

Chapter:
(p.103) 6 Learning How to Govern and Learning How to Solve Problems: On the Co‐Evolution of Competences, Conflicts and Organizational Routines*
Source:
The Dynamic Firm
Author(s):

Benjamin Coriat

Giovanni Dosi (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0198296045.003.0006

Highlights the specificity of organizational competencies and their routinized, inertial, and conflictual properties from the perspective of the individual firm, arguing that persistent and distinctive variation among firms can best be understood by taking these properties into account, but only after also taking account of the pervasive influence of institutions in different countries. The role of organizational routines in explaining firm differences is addressed; with the critical competencies of firms embodied in the operational routines, they are difficult to copy and their evolution is constrained by both the characteristics of the firm itself and the environment of the firm. This is designated ‘competence specificity’, where competencies are seen not only as involving problem‐solving and learning skills, but also as including skills and rules governing firm internal relationships; hence, there is also a dual role of organizational routines—as problem‐solving procedures, and as governance devices or mechanisms for coordination. The firm is then interpreted as a behavioural entity that must compromise between several different functions and activities; this complex picture is not reducible to viewing a firm simply as a nexus of contracts, instead, competencies and routines are viewed as co‐evolving with the environment in which they are embedded. Inertia is thus ‘built into’ this concept of the firm, and in prying open this ‘organizational black box’, the authors also indicate several avenues for future research.

Keywords:   companies, competence, competence specificity, conflict, coordination, firms, governance, inertia, institutions, learning skills, organizational competency, organizational routines, problem solving

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .