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A Not-so-dismal ScienceA Broader View of Economies and Societies$
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Mancur Olson and Satu Kähköhnen

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780198294900

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0198294905.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 15 November 2019

Overstrong Against Thyself: War, the State, and Growth in Europe on the Eve of the Industrial Revolution

Overstrong Against Thyself: War, the State, and Growth in Europe on the Eve of the Industrial Revolution

Chapter:
(p.138) 5 Overstrong Against Thyself: War, the State, and Growth in Europe on the Eve of the Industrial Revolution
Source:
A Not-so-dismal Science
Author(s):

J. Bradford De Long

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0198294905.003.0006

A historical analysis of early modern Western Europe demonstrates that it was the interests of princes and kings, and the forms of government, that mainly determined whether there was economic growth or stagnation—and that these even partly explain the Industrial Revolution. The different parts of the chapter discuss prince‐ and merchant‐dominated city states in pre‐industrial Europe, the military revolution (with sections on the decline of Spain, and the stagnation of the Dutch Republic), and the anomaly of Britain as the only nation state that continued to grow its economy under the burden of maintaining the military effort required of an early modern European great power.

Keywords:   city states, economic growth, Europe, government, history, Industrial Revolution, kings, military revolution, Netherlands princes, Spain, UK, Western Europe

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