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Approach to AestheticsCollected Papers on Philosophical Aesthetics$
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Frank Sibley, John Benson, Betty Redfern, and Jeremy Roxbee Cox

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780198238997

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0198238991.001.0001

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Aesthetic Concepts

Aesthetic Concepts

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Aesthetic Concepts
Source:
Approach to Aesthetics
Author(s):

Frank Sibley

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0198238991.003.0001

Here, Frank Sibley illuminates what it is for a term or an expression to be an aesthetic term or expression, i.e. in his view, a term that is such that taste or perceptiveness is required in order to apply it. He emphasises the natural basis of responses of various kinds without which aesthetic terms could not be learned, such as similarities of various sorts, notable colours, shapes, scents, size, and intricacy. Such natural responses enable us not only to learn aesthetic terms often by a metaphorical shift, but are also used subsequently to evaluate and illuminate works of art. It is in this sense that critics reinforce the relation between aesthetic terms and their natural bases.

Keywords:   aesthetics, colours, critic, Frank Sibley, intricacy, natural basis of aesthetic terms, perceptiveness, scent, shape, size, taste

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