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Women and Citizenship$
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Marilyn Friedman

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780195175349

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2005

DOI: 10.1093/0195175344.001.0001

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The Logic of Masculinist Protection: Reflections on the Current Security State

The Logic of Masculinist Protection: Reflections on the Current Security State

Chapter:
(p.14) (p.15) 1 The Logic of Masculinist Protection: Reflections on the Current Security State
Source:
Women and Citizenship
Author(s):

Iris Marion Young (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0195175344.003.0002

Young’s essay draws attention to practices of citizenship that can arise under a government at war and explores the logic of the masculine role of protector. A government at war, which Young calls a “security regime,” protects its members in an overly aggressive fashion from external dangers as well as from internal dissension. A state acting as a security regime, however, threatens to undermine democratic practice by expecting uncritical obedience and submissiveness from its population. This role toward its citizens is analogous to the role a protective family patriarch plays toward the women and children of his family. Young argues that, even from a protective government, what adult citizens want instead are relationships that respect their autonomy and equality.

Keywords:   patriarchy, autonomy, masculine role, security, war

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