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Teaching African American Religions$
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Carolyn M. Jones and Theodore Louis Trost

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780195167979

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2006

DOI: 10.1093/019516797X.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 29 January 2020

Teaching in the Contact Zone:

Teaching in the Contact Zone:

The African American Religions Course in the Large Public University

Chapter:
(p.13) 1 Teaching in the Contact Zone:
Source:
Teaching African American Religions
Author(s):

Carolyn M. Jones (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/019516797X.003.0002

In a course like African American religion, the classroom is a “contact zone”, a term used by Mary Louise Pratt. To illustrate the difficulties in dealing with the contact zone, this chapter describes an African American Religion course recently taught by the author of this book. It then looks at the issues involved when a classroom becomes a contact zone. The chapter then discusses the use of David Remnick's biography of Muhammed Ali, King of the World, and America in the Civil Rights era for understanding the significance of the Nation of Islam. Finally, building on the spiritual journey of Muhammed Ali, the central issue in teaching religion, transformation, whether it is African American Religion or not, is considered.

Keywords:   culture, African American, religion, Civil Rights, African American religion course, Islam

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