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Environmental JusticeCreating Equity, Reclaiming Democracy$
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Kristin Shrader-Frechette

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780195152036

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0195152034.001.0001

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African Americans, LULUs, and Free Informed Consent

African Americans, LULUs, and Free Informed Consent

Chapter:
(p.71) 4 African Americans, LULUs, and Free Informed Consent
Source:
Environmental Justice
Author(s):

Kristin Shrader‐Frechette

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0195152034.003.0004

Using case studies focusing on energy development in Louisiana, the chapter analyzes the concepts of equality and free informed consent in order to show how African‐Americans are typically victims of environmental injustice. In one chapter example, blacks were victimized by a multinational corporation seeking to build a production facility for nuclear energy. Carefully assessing the scientific and ethical flaws in the arguments for siting such facilities in poor and minority neighborhoods, the chapter focuses on the first major U.S. environmental‐justice victory, in Louisiana, in which the author and her students played a role. By assessing scientific and ethical flaws in the Louisiana environmental impact statements, they were able to protect affected minorities and stop the facility.

Keywords:   African‐Americans, blacks, citizenship, environmental injustice, environmental impact statement, equality, informed consent, justice, nuclear energy, responsibility, risk

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