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The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Theory$
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David Copp

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780195147797

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2006

DOI: 10.1093/0195147790.001.0001

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Morality and Practical Reason:

Morality and Practical Reason:

A KANTIAN APPROACH

Chapter:
(p.282) Chapter 11 MORALITY AND PRACTICAL REASON:
Source:
The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Theory
Author(s):

Stephen Darwall (Contributor Webpage)

, David Copp
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0195147790.003.0012

A central theme of Kant’s approach to moral philosophy is that moral obligations are categorical, by which he means that they provide supremely authoritative reasons for acting independently of an agent’s ends or interests. Kant argues that this is a reflection of our distinctive freedom or autonomy, as he calls it, as moral agents. A less, well- appreciated aspect of the Kantian picture of morality and respect for the dignity of each individual person is the idea of reciprocal accountability, that moral agents are mutually responsible for their treatment of one another. Viewing Kant’s ethics from this second-person standpoint opens up a line of thought that promises to vindicate the Kantian idea that moral obligations are categorical imperatives.

Keywords:   moral obligation, autonomy, freedom, moral agent, accountability, categorical imperatives, second-person standpoint, respect, dignity

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