Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Oxford Handbook of Rationality$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Alfred R. Mele and Piers Rawling

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780195145397

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2005

DOI: 10.1093/0195145399.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 22 May 2019

MOTIVATED IRRATIONALITY

MOTIVATED IRRATIONALITY

Chapter:
(p.240) chapter 13 MOTIVATED IRRATIONALITY
Source:
The Oxford Handbook of Rationality
Author(s):

Alfred R. Mele (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0195145399.003.0013

Mele explores two kinds of motivated irrationality and reviews philosophical literature on them: akratic action (action exhibiting so-called weakness of will or deficient self-control) and motivationally biased belief (including self-deception). When agents act akratically, they act for reasons, and in central cases, they make rational judgments about what it is best to do. Although the rationality required for that is in place, to the extent to which their actions are at odds with these judgments, they act irrationally. Motivationally biased believers test hypotheses and believe on the basis of evidence. Again there is a background of rationality, but, owing to the influence of motivation, they violate general standards of epistemic rationality.

Keywords:   action, akrasia, background of rationality, epistemic rationality, explanation, motivationally biased belief, irrationality, paradox, self-deception, weakness of will

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .