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Noah's CurseThe Biblical Justification of American Slavery$
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Stephen R. Haynes

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780195142792

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0195142799.001.0001

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A Black Sheep in the (Second) First Family

A Black Sheep in the (Second) First Family

The Legend of Noah and His Sons

Chapter:
(p.23) 2 A Black Sheep in the (Second) First Family
Source:
Noah's Curse
Author(s):

Stephen R. Haynes (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0195142799.003.0002

This chapter traces Genesis 9's history of interpretation from the formative periods of Judaism and Christianity through the twentieth century in order to establish a context for recognizing the distinctive features in American versions of Noah's curse. Reviewing this history of interpretation illumines the parameters of an orthodox interpretive paradigm that emerged in rabbinic and patristic commentary and which has governed the interpretation of Genesis 9:20–27 since Jews and Christians began to read and comment on this Bible story. According to this orthodox paradigm, Ham the villain is contrasted with his righteous brothers Shem and Japheth.

Keywords:   Bible, Christianity, commentary, Genesis, Ham, Japheth, Judaism, patristic, rabbinic, Shem

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