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Mobilizing for PeaceConflict Resolution in Northern Ireland, South Africa, and Israel/Palestine$
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Benjamin Gidron, Stanley N. Katz, and Yeheskel Hasenfeld

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780195125924

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0195125924.001.0001

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A Comparative View: Peace and Conflict‐Resolution Organizations in Three Protracted Conflicts

A Comparative View: Peace and Conflict‐Resolution Organizations in Three Protracted Conflicts

Chapter:
(p.175) 8 A Comparative View: Peace and Conflict‐Resolution Organizations in Three Protracted Conflicts
Source:
Mobilizing for Peace
Author(s):

Megan Meyer

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0195125924.003.0008

Most peace and conflict‐resolution organizations (P/CROs) were founded between 1980 and 1990, in response to heightened conflict in their regions; charismatic leaders – usually highly educated and politically astute – and local networks played instrumental roles. Most P/CROs relied on international funding. South African P/CROs received funding from foreign governments, international multilateral agencies, and religious institutions, Israeli/Palestinian P/CROs from private foreign donors and foundations, and Northern Irish P/CROs mainly from the UK and the European Union. All P/CROs used a variety of tactics, but emphasized a package of tactics that fit their members’ beliefs, interests, and skills; there was only slight variation in tactics across regions, but political context did play a small role in determining “tastes in tactics.” Almost all P/CROs, whatever their initial aspirations, became somewhat formalized as they aged. P/CROs in Northern Ireland tended to frame the conflict in terms of personal attitudes; in South Africa and Israel/Palestine, P/CRO frames emphasized systemic factors.

Keywords:   charismatic leaders, frame, heightened conflict, international funding, Israel/Palestine, local networks, Northern Ireland, peace and conflict‐resolution organizations (P/CROs), South Africa, tactics

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