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Mobilizing for PeaceConflict Resolution in Northern Ireland, South Africa, and Israel/Palestine$
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Benjamin Gidron, Stanley N. Katz, and Yeheskel Hasenfeld

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780195125924

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2003

DOI: 10.1093/0195125924.001.0001

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South Africa: The Role of Peace and Conflict‐Resolution Organizations in the Struggle Against Apartheid

South Africa: The Role of Peace and Conflict‐Resolution Organizations in the Struggle Against Apartheid

Chapter:
(p.69) 4 South Africa: The Role of Peace and Conflict‐Resolution Organizations in the Struggle Against Apartheid
Source:
Mobilizing for Peace
Author(s):

Rupert Taylor

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/0195125924.003.0004

Participation in civil society was one of the few options for the pursuit of peaceful progressive change in apartheid South Africa, and a range of peace and conflict‐resolution organizations (P/CROs) explored this option. These P/CROs were staffed mainly by middle class, white, university educated, English‐speaking males, exhibited significant levels of formalization and centralization, depended heavily on international funding, and were often harassed by the apartheid state. P/CROs were active in antimilitarization activities, mediation, promoting contact between white and black communities, encouraging dialog between elites, and research. Extensive links developed amongst P/CROs, between P/CROs and other kinds of antiapartheid nongovernmental organizations, and between some P/CROs and the mass‐based resistance movements; collectively, these organizations formed a “multiorganizational field.” P/CROs, in concert with the rest of the multiorganizational field, helped project an “emergent reality” – a nonracial and democratic South Africa; established channels of communication between the apartheid state and the resistance movement; and ripened the climate for political change.

Keywords:   apartheid, civil society, emergent reality, mass‐based resistance movements, multiorganizational field, nongovernmental organizations, peace and conflict‐resolution organizations (P/CROs), political change, South Africa

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