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Sensory Blending
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Sensory Blending: On Synaesthesia and related phenomena

Ophelia Deroy

Abstract

If synaesthesia is defined, as Cytowic once proposed, as a strange sensory blending, the category can include many other cases beyond the well-known colored-hearing and color-grapheme experiences. The extension of the category of synaesthesia to cases like mirror-touch, personification, crossmodal mappings, and drug experiences has helped produce a range of new evidence for the causes and prevalence of the condition. It also raises new questions regarding the unity of the synaesthetic label. The volume provides an overview of the varieties of sensory blending counted as ‘synaesthetic’, and dis ... More

Keywords: synaesthesia, multisensory interaction, crossmodal correspondence, perception, consciousness, sensory substitution, illusion, hallucination, mirror-touch

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2017 Print ISBN-13: 9780199688289
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2017 DOI:10.1093/oso/9780199688289.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Ophelia Deroy, editor
University of London

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Contents

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Introduction

Ophelia Deroy

Part I Defining and Measuring Synaesthesia

1 Synesthesia, Then and Now

Lawrence E. Marks

Part II Challenges Raised by Synaesthesia

5 Synesthesia and Consciousness

Myrto Mylopoulos and Tony Ro

Part III Boundaries of Synaesthesia: Unconscious, Acquired, and Social Varieties of Sensory Unions

10 Questioning the Continuity Claim

Ophelia Deroy and Charles Spence

11 The Induction of Synaesthesia in Non-Synaesthetes

Devin B. Terhune, David P. Luke, and Roi Cohen Kadosh

12 Patrolling the Boundaries of Synaesthesia

Malika Auvray and Mirko Farina1

13 Mirror-Touch Synaesthesia

Frédérique de Vignemont

14 Personification, Synaesthesia, and Social Cognition

Noam Sagiv,1 Monika Sobczak-Edmans, and Adrian L. Williams

End Matter