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Living machines: A handbook of research in biomimetics and biohybrid systems

Tony J. Prescott, Nathan Lepora, and Paul F.M.J Verschure

Abstract

Biomimetics is the development of novel technologies through the distillation of ideas from the study of biological systems. Biohybrids are formed through the combination of at least one biological component—an existing living system—and at least one artificial, newly engineered component. These two fields are united under the theme of Living Machines—the idea that we can construct artifacts that not only mimic life but also build on the same fundamental principles. The research described in this volume seeks to understand and emulate life’s ability to self-organize, metabolize, grow, and repr ... More

Keywords: novel technologies, biomimetics, biohybrids, living systems, living machines, biological principles, technology ethics, societal impacts

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2018 Print ISBN-13: 9780199674923
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2018 DOI:10.1093/oso/9780199674923.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Tony J. Prescott, editor
Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience, Sheffield Robotics, The University of Sheffield, UK

Nathan Lepora, editor
Senior Lecturer in Engineering Mathematics, Department of Engineering Mathematics and Bristol Robotics Laboratory, University of Bristol, UK

Paul F.M.J Verschure, editor
Research Professor and Director, Catalan Institute for Bioengineering, Spain

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Contents

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Section I Roadmaps

Chapter 1 Living Machines

Tony J. Prescott1 and Paul F. M. J. Verschure2

Chapter 2 A Living Machines approach to the sciences of mind and brain

Paul F. M. J. Verschure1 and Tony J. Prescott2

Chapter 3 A roadmap for Living Machines research

Nathan F. Lepora1, Paul F. M. J. Verschure2, and Tony J. Prescott3

Section II Life

Chapter 4 Life

Tony J. Prescott, sheffield Robotics and Department of Computer Science, University of Sheffield, UK

Chapter 5 Self-organization

Stuart P. Wilson, department of Psychology, University of Sheffield, UK

Chapter 6 Energy and metabolism

Ioannis A. Ieropoulos1,2, Pablo Ledezma1, Giacomo Scandroglio1, Chris Melhuish1, and John Greenman1,2

Chapter 7 Reproduction

Matthew S. Moses and Gregory S. Chirikjian, johns Hopkins University, USA

Chapter 8 Evo-devo

Tony J. Prescott1 and Leah Krubitzer2

Chapter 9 Growth and tropism

Barbara Mazzolai, center for Micro-BioRobotics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Italy

Chapter 10 Biomimetic materials

Julian Vincent, school of Engineering, Heriot-Watt University, UK

Chapter 11 Modeling self and others

Josh Bongard, department of Computer Science, University of Vermont, USA

Chapter 12 Towards a general theory of evolution

Terrence W. Deacon, anthropology Department, University of California, Berkeley, USA

Section III Building blocks

Chapter 13 Building blocks

Nathan F. Lepora, department of Engineering Mathematics and Bristol Robotics Laboratory, University of Bristol, UK

Chapter 14 Vision

Piotr Dudek, school of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, The University of Manchester, UK

Chapter 15 Audition

Leslie S. Smith, department of Computing, Science and Mathematics, University of Stirling, UK

Chapter 16 Touch

Nathan F. Lepora, department of Engineering Mathematics and Bristol Robotics Laboratory, University of Bristol, UK

Chapter 17 Chemosensation

Tim C. Pearce, department of Engineering, University of Leicester, UK

Chapter 18 Proprioception and body schema

Minoru Asada, graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Japan

Chapter 19 Electric sensing for underwater navigation

Frédéric Boyer and Vincent Lebastard, automation, Production and Computer Sciences Department, IMT Atlantique (former Ecole des Mines de Nantes), France

Chapter 20 Muscles

Iain A. Anderson and Benjamin M. O’Brien, auckland Bioengineering Institute, The University of Auckland, New Zealand

Chapter 21 Rhythms and oscillations

Allen Selverston, division of Biological Science, University of California, San Diego, USA

Chapter 22 Skin and dry adhesion

Changhyun Pang1, Chanseok Lee2, Hoon Eui Jeong3, and Kahp-Yang Suh2

Section IV Capabilities

Chapter 23 Capabilities

Paul F. M. J. Verschure, SPECS, Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), the Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST), and Catalan Institute of Advanced Studies (ICREA), Spain

Chapter 24 Pattern generation

Holk Cruse and Malte Schilling, universität Bielefeld, Germany

Chapter 25 Perception

Joel Z. Leibo1,2 and Tomaso Poggio1

Chapter 26 Learning and control

Ivan Herreros, SPECS, Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), the Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST), Barcelona, Spain

Chapter 27 Attention and orienting

Ben Mitchinson, department of Psychology, University of Sheffield, UK

Chapter 28 Decision making

Nathan F. Lepora, department of Engineering Mathematics and Bristol Robotics Laboratory, University of Bristol, UK

Chapter 29 Spatial and episodic memory

Uğur Murat Erdem1, Nicholas Roy2, John J. Leonard2, and Michael E. Hasselmo3

Chapter 30 Reach, grasp, and manipulate

Mark R. Cutkosky, school of Engineering, Stanford University, USA

Chapter 31 Quadruped locomotion

Hartmut Witte1, Martin S. Fischer2, Holger Preuschoft3, Danja Voges1, Cornelius Schilling1, and Auke Jan Ijspeert4

Chapter 32 Flight

Anders Hedenström, department of Biology, Lund University, Sweden

Chapter 33 Communication

Robert H. Wortham and Joanna J. Bryson, department of Computer Science, University of Bath, UK

Chapter 34 Emotions and self-regulation

Vasiliki Vouloutsi1 and Paul F. M. J. Verschure1,2

Chapter 35 The architecture of mind and brain

Paul F. M. J. Verschure, SPECS, Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), the Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST), and Catalan Institute of Advanced Studies (ICREA), Spain

Chapter 36 A chronology of Distributed Adaptive Control

Paul F. M. J. Verschure, SPECS, Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), the Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST), and Catalan Institute of Advanced Studies (ICREA), Spain

Chapter 37 Consciousness

Anil K. Seth, sackler Centre for Consciousness Science, University of Sussex, UK

Section V Living machines

Chapter 38 Biomimetic systems

Tony J. Prescott, sheffield Robotics and Department of Computer Science, University of Sheffield, UK

Chapter 39 Toward living nanomachines

Christof Mast1, Friederike Möller1, Moritz Kreysing2, Severin Schink3, Benedikt Obermayer4, Ulrich Gerland3, and Dieter Braun1

Chapter 40 From slime molds to soft deformable robots

Akio Ishiguro1 and Takuya Umedachi2

Chapter 41 Soft-bodied terrestrial invertebrates and robots

Barry Trimmer, biology Department, Tufts University, Medford, USA

Chapter 43 Cooperation in collective systems

Stefano Nolfi, laboratory of Autonomous Robots and Artificial Life, Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies (CNR-ISTC), Rome, Italy

Chapter 44 From aquatic animals to robot swimmers

Maarja Kruusmaa, centre for Biorobotics, Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia

Chapter 45 Mammals and mammal-like robots

Tony J. Prescott, sheffield Robotics and Department of Computer Science, University of Sheffield, UK

Chapter 46 Winged artifacts

Wolfgang Send, ANIPROP GbR, Göttingen, Germany

Chapter 47 Humans and humanoids

Giorgio Metta and Roberto Cingolani, istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Genoa, Italy

Section VI Biohybrid systems

Chapter 48 Biohybrid systems

Nathan F. Lepora, department of Engineering Mathematics and Bristol Robotics Laboratory, University of Bristol, UK

Chapter 49 Brain–machine interfaces

Girijesh Prasad, school of Computing, Engineering and Intelligent Systems, Ulster University, Londonderry, UK

Chapter 50 Implantable neural interfaces

Stefano Vassanelli, department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Padova, Italy

Chapter 51 Biohybrid robots are synthetic biology systems

Joseph Ayers, marine Science Center, Northeastern University, USA

Chapter 52 Micro- and nanotechnology for living machines

Toshio Fukuda1, Masahiro Nakajima2, Masaru Takeuchi3, and Yasuhisa Hasegawa3

Chapter 53 Biohybrid touch interfaces

Sliman J. Bensmaia, department of Organismal Biology and Anatomy, University of Chicago, USA

Chapter 54 Implantable hearing interfaces

Torsten Lehmann1 and André van Schaik2

Chapter 55 Hippocampal memory prosthesis

Dong Song and Theodore W. Berger, department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA

Section VII Perspectives

Chapter 56 Perspectives

Michael Szollosy, sheffield Robotics, University of Sheffield, UK

Chapter 57 Human augmentation and the age of the transhuman

James Hughes, institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies, Boston, USA

Chapter 59 Neurorehabilitation

Belén Rubio Ballester, SPECS, Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), the Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST), Barcelona, Spain

Chapter 60 Human relationships with living machines

Abigail Millings and Emily C. Collins, department of Psychology, University of Sheffield, UK

Chapter 61 Living machines in our cultural imagination

Michael Szollosy, sheffield Robotics and Department of Computer Science, University of Sheffield, UK

Chapter 62 The ethics of virtual reality and telepresence

Hannah Maslen and Julian Savulescu, oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, University of Oxford, UK

Chapter 63 Can machines have rights?

David J. Gunkel, department of Communication, Northern Illinois University, USA

Chapter 65 Sustainability of living machines

José Halloy, paris Interdisciplinary Energy Research Institute (LIED), Université Paris Diderot, France

End Matter