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Legitimacy in Global GovernanceSources, Processes, and Consequences$
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Jonas Tallberg, Karin Bäckstrand, and Jan Aart Scholte

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780198826873

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198826873.001.0001

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Individual Sources of Legitimacy Beliefs

Individual Sources of Legitimacy Beliefs

Theory and Data

Chapter:
(p.37) 3 Individual Sources of Legitimacy Beliefs
Source:
Legitimacy in Global Governance
Author(s):

Lisa M. Dellmuth

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198826873.003.0003

This chapter examines individual-level factors that may influence legitimacy beliefs towards global governance institutions. The chapter surveys the full breadth of existing political science research in order to chart a forward course for empirical studies of individual-level sources of legitimacy beliefs. The chapter’s threefold core argument maintains, first, that global governance scholarship needs to build on previous insights on legitimacy beliefs from comparative politics and social psychology. Second, research on beliefs in the legitimacy of global governance institutions needs to look comparatively across countries, institutions, issue areas, social groups, and time. Third, future research on sources of legitimacy in global governance can acquire better measures through the use of large-scale surveys and survey experiments.

Keywords:   cosmopolitan identity, elite communication, legitimacy, global governance, international organization, international institution, public opinion, social identity

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