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Capitalism Beyond Mutuality?Perspectives Integrating Philosophy and Social Science$
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Subramanian Rangan

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780198825067

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198825067.001.0001

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A Dialogue Between Business and Philosophy

A Dialogue Between Business and Philosophy

Chapter:
(p.58) Chapter 3 A Dialogue Between Business and Philosophy
Source:
Capitalism Beyond Mutuality?
Author(s):

Bertrand Collomb

Susan Neiman

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198825067.003.0003

Is there a way of doing business that can sustain material progress without displacing other values that are the essence of the good life? This chapter is a dialogue on this and related questions. Has the present economic system reversed the means–end relation between markets and life? What forms of reasoning and value might redress this? Given our growing awareness and relations, what responsibilities do we have toward people in other parts of the planet? Will enterprises face a sunset on the notion of limited liability? The chapter discusses the marketing economy’s manufacture of needs and the seeming overfinancialization of the economy. It concludes by proposing that if something is necessary to act morally, it is rational for us to believe in it. The spontaneous outcomes of the free market have to be evaluated against our societal goals, and the process reshaped via education and not only regulation.

Keywords:   market ideology, freedom, trade-off, fundamentalism, bottom-line thinking, progress, Marx, choice, capitalism, finance economy

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