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Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion Volume 8$
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Jonathan L. Kvanvig

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198806967

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198806967.001.0001

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Sufferer-Centered Requirements on Theodicy and All-Things-Considered Harms

Sufferer-Centered Requirements on Theodicy and All-Things-Considered Harms

Chapter:
(p.71) 4 Sufferer-Centered Requirements on Theodicy and All-Things-Considered Harms
Source:
Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion Volume 8
Author(s):

Dustin Crummett

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198806967.003.0004

Both Marilyn Adams and Eleonore Stump have endorsed requirements on theodicy which, if true, imply that we can never suffer all-things-considered harms. William Hasker has offered a series of arguments intended to show that this implication is unacceptable. This chapter evaluates Hasker’s arguments and finds them lacking. However, it also argues that Hasker’s arguments can be modified or expanded in ways that make them very powerful. The chapter closes by considering why God might not meet the requirements endorsed by Stump and Adams and shows how they can modify their requirements to avoid the untenable implications about harm while still respecting the concerns that motivated their requirements in the first place.

Keywords:   problem of evil, sufferer-centered requirements, Marilyn McCord Adams, Eleonore Stump, William Hasker

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