Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Littlehampton LibelsA Miscarriage of Justice and a Mystery about Words in 1920s England$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Christopher Hilliard

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198799658

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198799658.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 22 September 2018

It Is Not My Verdict

It Is Not My Verdict

Chapter:
(p.145) 10 It Is Not My Verdict
Source:
The Littlehampton Libels
Author(s):

Christopher Hilliard

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198799658.003.0012

Scurrilous letters continued to circulate after Edith Swan’s acquittal. The authorities moved again nearly two years later. The DPP sought the help of the General Post Office’s Investigative Branch. They ran a sting operation using stamps specially marked with invisible ink. Swan was caught and charged again. Her second trial was another media event, and Travers Humphreys, again appearing for the prosecution, felt obliged to remind the jury ‘that they were not living in the pages of a sensational novel, but . . . were dealing with facts in real life’. Swan appeared before Mr Justice Avory again, who summed up in her favour, but the jury found her guilty and she went to prison for a year.

Keywords:   General Post Office, invisible ink, stamps, surveillance, libel, Horace Avory, Travers Humphreys, Archibald Bodkin

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .