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Seeking SanctuaryCrime, Mercy, and Politics in English Courts, 1400-1550$
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Shannon McSheffrey

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198798149

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: July 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198798149.001.0001

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The Sanctuary Town of Knowle

The Sanctuary Town of Knowle

Crime, Local Authorities, and the State in 1530s England

Chapter:
(p.140) 6 The Sanctuary Town of Knowle
Source:
Seeking Sanctuary
Author(s):

Shannon McSheffrey

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198798149.003.0006

A 1537 case of a thief who fled to sanctuary in Knowle, a town in Warwickshire, shows in some detail the ins and outs of the administration of this small sanctuary and more generally the workings of sanctuary in the later 1530s. Even at this late date, and in a disputed case, it is important to note that no one questioned the town’s sanctuary privileges (based on its status as a dependent manor of Westminster Abbey). The records associated with the case demonstrate the structural interlacing of the management of sanctuary with the administration of the king’s justice and its imbrication in the complicated lines of patronage and office-holding in Henrician England.

Keywords:   sanctuary, crime, politics, law, state formation, early modern England

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