Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Seeking SanctuaryCrime, Mercy, and Politics in English Courts, 1400-1550$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Shannon McSheffrey

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198798149

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: July 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198798149.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 19 November 2018

Dean Caudray and the City of London

Dean Caudray and the City of London

The Politics of Sanctuary in the Fifteenth Century

Chapter:
(p.58) 3 Dean Caudray and the City of London
Source:
Seeking Sanctuary
Author(s):

Shannon McSheffrey

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198798149.003.0003

Between the 1420s and the 1450s, the City of London and the collegiate church of St Martin le Grand had a long-running conflict over the church’s sanctuary privileges. The records of the dispute show us how Dean Richard Caudray of St Martin’s constructed claims for his church’s sanctuary privilege, and how the mayor and aldermen of London responded when they found those privileges encroached on their own developing ideas about jurisdiction. In a broad sense, Caudray ‘won’ his battles with the City in the mid-fifteenth century both by more successful appeals to Henry VI’s ideas about mercy and kingship and by linking the chapel’s sanctuary privileges with its other liberties. The outcome of the conflict embedded chartered sanctuary more securely in the English legal and political landscape.

Keywords:   sanctuary, London, Middle Ages, jurisdiction, mercy, politics, archives

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .