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Greek Tragic Women on Shakespearean Stages$

Tanya Pollard

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198793113

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198793113.001.0001

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(p.289) Bibliography

(p.289) Bibliography

Source:
Greek Tragic Women on Shakespearean Stages
Author(s):

Tanya Pollard

Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Bibliography references:

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