Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Political Economy of Rural-Urban ConflictPredation, Production, and Peripheries$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Topher L. McDougal

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198792598

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198792598.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 10 December 2018

Stateless State-Led Industrialization

Stateless State-Led Industrialization

Chapter:
(p.93) 4 Stateless State-Led Industrialization
Source:
The Political Economy of Rural-Urban Conflict
Author(s):

Topher L. McDougal

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198792598.003.0004

What befalls economies that descend into violence? This chapter suggests that the splintered trade networks described in Chapter 2 effectively forced firms in Liberia to localize many of their inputs and to internalize many of the functions that would otherwise be external—imitating the effects of import-substitution and state-led industrialization policies. Specifically, the war economy in Liberia mimicked import tariffs, localized the staffs of many companies, raised local content in products, and even spurred technical learning and knowledge accumulation. In calling attention to ways in which violence localized supply chains, this chapter suggests that the interplay between violent predation is itself a reaction to the structure of global value chains.

Keywords:   economy, conflict, production firms, import-substitution industrialization, state-led industrialization, Liberia

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .