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Reading Republican OratoryReconstructions, Contexts, Receptions$
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Christa Gray, Andrea Balbo, Richard M. A. Marshall, and Catherine E. W. Steel

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780198788201

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198788201.001.0001

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Netting the Wolf-Fish

Netting the Wolf-Fish

Gaius Titius in Macrobius and Cicero

Chapter:
(p.135) 8 Netting the Wolf-Fish
Source:
Reading Republican Oratory
Author(s):

John Dugan

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198788201.003.0009

This chapter offers a close reading of a single oratorical fragment, a passage ascribed to the second-century BC orator C. Titius quoted by Macrobius (Sat. 3.16.15‒16). The chapter explores the range of contexts we can use as readers to try to make sense of the passage, suggesting that quotation practices can illuminate aspects of the quoted text we miss if we concentrate simply on the testimonia to Titius’ activity as an orator as traditionally understood. In this particular case, attention to Macrobius’ concern with luxury and consumption, and the emblematic wolf-fish, also points towards a more general understanding of the use of fragments in antiquity as material for the quoting author to digest and transform.

Keywords:   fragments, Macrobius, quotation practices, Gaius Titius, luxury, consumption, wolf-fish

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