Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Thinking about the EmotionsA Philosophical History$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Alix Cohen and Robert Stern

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198766858

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198766858.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 21 November 2017

The Passions and Actions of Laughter in Shaftesbury and Hutcheson

The Passions and Actions of Laughter in Shaftesbury and Hutcheson

Chapter:
(p.130) 6 The Passions and Actions of Laughter in Shaftesbury and Hutcheson
Source:
Thinking about the Emotions
Author(s):

Laurent Jaffro

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198766858.003.0007

The third Earl of Shaftesbury and Francis Hutcheson considered laughter as a passion in its own right. The hilarious response is not reducible, as Hobbes believed, to the facial expression of the sudden awareness of our own superiority. Ridicule is however an important kind of laughter; it is also an action, part of a strategy against the seriousness of fanaticism. Shaftesbury gives much importance to the politics of laughter and to the caustic power of ridicule, but also to the capacity to laugh at one’s laughter, which is crucial to what he calls good humour. Hutcheson and Shaftesbury interestingly disagree on the question of how to regulate laughter and limit its abuse.

Keywords:   humour, ridicule, mirth, Francis Hutcheson, third Earl of Shaftesbury, passion, British moralists

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .