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A History of Modern Political Thought in East Central EuropeVolume II: Negotiating Modernity in the 'Short Twentieth Century' and Beyond, Part I: 1918-1968$
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Balázs Trencsényi, Michal Kopeček, Luka Lisjak Gabrijelčič, Maria Falina, Mónika Baár, and Maciej Janowski

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780198737155

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198737155.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 15 December 2018

Toward Socialism with a Human Face?

Toward Socialism with a Human Face?

Chapter:
(p.371) 10 Toward Socialism with a Human Face?
Source:
A History of Modern Political Thought in East Central Europe
Author(s):

Balázs Trencsényi

Michal Kopeček

Luka Lisjak Gabrijelčič

Maria Falina

Mónika Baár

Maciej Janowski

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198737155.003.0010

Marxist revisionism, providing a powerful political language of intra-systemic opposition, was characterized by an effort to restore the relative autonomy of the personality in the face of both society and history, to provide new ethics, a new way of life, and envision “socialism with a human face.” The 1960s witnessed an unprecedented boom of Marxist and non-Marxist intellectual and cultural production, ranging from the rediscovery of the inconvenient past to critical analyses of existing socialist societies and an artistic blossoming reconnecting East Central Europe to broader European intellectual and aesthetic currents. Another venue of dialogue was between unorthodox Marxists and religious thinkers struggling to find their way in secular state socialist regimes. The climax and eventually also the anti-climax of this revival was 1968, with the rise of reform communist movements, linking technocratic and democratic reformism with revolutionary radicalism coming mainly from the student movements.

Keywords:   Marxist revisionism, Marxist renaissance, reform communism, socialist democracy, “socialism with a human face,” student movements, existentialism

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