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The Swiss and their Neighbours, 1460-1560Between Accommodation and Aggression$
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Tom Scott

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198725275

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: July 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198725275.001.0001

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The Romandie Reconfigured

The Romandie Reconfigured

Chapter:
(p.158) 28 The Romandie Reconfigured
Source:
The Swiss and their Neighbours, 1460-1560
Author(s):

Tom Scott

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198725275.003.0029

The restoration of Duke Emmanuel Philibert to Savoy in 1564 led to Bern surrendering lands beyond the Vaud (Gex, western Chablais), while the Valais communes gave up the eastern Chablais. The indebted countess of Neuchâtel allegedly offered to sell her territory to Fribourg in 1543, which would have potentially saved it for Catholicism, but Fribourg was stymied by Bern. The equally indebted Count Michel of Gruyère sought to borrow money in turn from Fribourg and Bern, even offering to sell the county wholesale. In the end Gruyère was partitioned between Fribourg and Bern, as foreshadowed in 1537. The territorial gains had added one-tenth to the size of the Confederation, but Bern remained by far the largest city-state north of the Alps. Geneva tried but failed to be admitted as a canton of the Confederation, but beat off a further attack from Savoy in 1602 (the Escalade).

Keywords:   Duke Emmanuel Philibert, Bern and Valais surrender territory, Gex, Chablais, Neuchâtel, Fribourg, Gruyère, partition of Gruyère, Geneva, Escalade

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