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The Swiss and their Neighbours, 1460-1560Between Accommodation and Aggression$
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Tom Scott

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198725275

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: July 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780198725275.001.0001

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Savoy Strikes Back

Savoy Strikes Back

Chapter:
(p.103) 20 Savoy Strikes Back
Source:
The Swiss and their Neighbours, 1460-1560
Author(s):

Tom Scott

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780198725275.003.0021

Duke Charles’s harassment of Geneva from the 1510s led to the arrest and execution of leading councillors and the formation of a pro-Swiss party, the Eidguenots, led by Besançon Hugues. Savoy claimed the office of justiciar (vidomne) by virtue of its imperial vicariate, which also threatened the rights of the bishop, whose supporters styled themselves Mammelus, though many were pro-Savoy. In 1519, prompted by refugees from the city, Fribourg concluded a Burgrecht with Geneva, whereupon Savoy laid siege to Geneva. The Burgrecht was rescinded, but renewed aggression against Lausanne led to a Burgrecht between it and Bern and Fribourg in 1525, followed by another with Geneva in 1526. By then Duke Charles had abandoned neutrality as Savoy lent towards Emperor Charles V, much to the chagrin of France.

Keywords:   Savoy’s attack on Geneva, Eidguenots, Besançon Hugues, Mammelus, rights of the bishop, vidomne, Burgrechte with Lausanne, then Geneva, Savoy as imperial ally

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