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From Conquest to DeportationThe North Caucasus under Russian Rule$
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Jeronim Perovic

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780190889890

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190889890.001.0001

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At the Fringes of the Stalinist Mobilising Society

At the Fringes of the Stalinist Mobilising Society

The Path to Deportation

Chapter:
(p.255) 8 At the Fringes of the Stalinist Mobilising Society
Source:
From Conquest to Deportation
Author(s):

Jeronim Perović

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190889890.003.0009

In order to understand Moscow’s decision to deport the Chechens and other North Caucasians in 1943-4, it is essential to analyze the situation as it presented itself to the Soviet leadership during the late 1930s and early 1940s. The topics covered in this chapter include an in-depth analysis of the functioning of Chechen society and politics, including the role of traditional clan and family structures; the difficulties of the various state mobilization campaigns, namely the effort to mobilize soldiers for the Red Army; the situation in the Chechen-Ingush republic during World War II and the phenomenon of desertions and anti-Soviet rebellions.

Keywords:   Mobilization, World War II, Terror, Stalinism, Deportation, North Caucasus, Chechens, Desertion, Anti-Soviet rebellions, Lavrentii Beriia

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