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Facing SegregationHousing Policy Solutions for a Stronger Society$
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Molly W. Metzger and Henry S. Webber

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780190862305

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190862305.001.0001

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Concluding Thoughts on an Agenda for Solving Segregation

Concluding Thoughts on an Agenda for Solving Segregation

Chapter:
(p.233) 12 Concluding Thoughts on an Agenda for Solving Segregation
Source:
Facing Segregation
Author(s):

Henry S. Webber

Molly W. Metzger

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190862305.003.0012

Economic and racial segregation are major challenges to the United States. Without concerted government action to reduce segregation, however, little progress is likely. The chapters in this volume recommend three major strategies for government action. First is promoting integration in high-opportunity neighborhoods by supporting the movement of poor minorities into affluent, usually majority-white areas. Second is redeveloping areas of concentrated poverty as mixed-race, mixed-income neighborhoods. Third is encouraging the maintenance and expansion of existing, economically diverse middle neighborhoods. All of these steps are challenging and require significant changes in federal or local public policy. This concluding chapter conveys the importance of tackling these challenges and the need to build a political movement for reducing segregation.

Keywords:   Civil Rights Act of 1964, collective action, discrimination, economic segregation, Fair Housing Act, income inequality, justice, open housing, racial segregation

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