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The Common Law in Colonial AmericaVolume IV: Law and the Constitution on the Eve of Independence, 1735-1776$
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William E. Nelson

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780190850487

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190850487.001.0001

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Terminating the Ties of Empire

Terminating the Ties of Empire

Chapter:
(p.129) 8 Terminating the Ties of Empire
Source:
The Common Law in Colonial America
Author(s):

William E. Nelson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190850487.003.0009

This chapter discusses a series of armed rebellions involving the Paxton Boys in Pennsylvania, the Regulators in North and South Carolina, and rent strikers in New York that foreshadowed the War for Independence. It also discusses a series of cases and controversies occurring between 1766 and 1776, a period of truce, in which lawyers, often representing the economic interests of their clients, made constitutional arguments in support of established localist and common law practices. The chapter ends with an analysis of legal breakdowns in the imperial system occurring between the time of the Boston Tea Party and the Declaration of Independence.

Keywords:   Forsey v. Cunningham, Freebody v. Benton, Lord Dunmore, rebellion, Massachusetts Government Act

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