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Youth, Jobs, and the FutureProblems and Prospects$
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Lynn S. Chancer, Martín Sánchez-Jankowski, and Christine Trost

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780190685898

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2018

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190685898.001.0001

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The Children of Low-Status Immigrants and Youth Unemployment in the United States and Western Europe

The Children of Low-Status Immigrants and Youth Unemployment in the United States and Western Europe

Chapter:
(p.119) 6 The Children of Low-Status Immigrants and Youth Unemployment in the United States and Western Europe
Source:
Youth, Jobs, and the Future
Author(s):

Richard Alba

Nancy Foner

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190685898.003.0007

This chapter examines the challenges faced by the children of low-status immigrants in education and the labor market. While youth in general face more challenges in the early twenty-first-century than their parents and grandparents did, many of these second-generation youth face a special set of hurdles because of their disadvantaged immigrant origins. In education, the second generations originating from low-status groups suffer “ethnic penalties.” One reason is that many adults in positions of authority in school systems and workplaces hold prejudices that lead to subtle or occasionally blatant discrimination against these second-generation youth. The problems in the educational system are compounded by those these youth face when they enter the labor market. In general, they are less likely to be employed than native youth with comparable educational attainment, and sometimes, as in France and Germany, these employment penalties are large.

Keywords:   low-status immigrants, education, labor market, second-generation youth, ethnic penalty, discrimination, educational system, employment penalty

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