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Dissemination and Implementation Research in HealthTranslating Science to Practice$
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Ross C. Brownson, Graham A. Colditz, and Enola K. Proctor

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190683214

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190683214.001.0001

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Historical Roots of Dissemination and Implementation Science

Historical Roots of Dissemination and Implementation Science

Chapter:
(p.47) 3 Historical Roots of Dissemination and Implementation Science
Source:
Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health
Author(s):

James W. Dearing

Kerk F. Kee

Tai-Quan Peng

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190683214.003.0003

This chapter describes the evolution of diffusion of innovations theory, and how concepts from that paradigm as well as knowledge utilization and technology transfer research have contributed to the evidence-based medicine and evidence-based public health emphases in dissemination and implementation. It covers methods of studying how new innovations are adopted. The authors suggest that dissemination and implementation researchers and practitioners will continue to find relevance and applicability in these former research traditions as they seek ways to study and apply new information and communication technologies to the challenges of dissemination activity by innovation proponents, diffusion responses by adopters, and then subsequent implementation and sustained use.

Keywords:   communication, diffusion, innovations, knowledge utilization, relative advantage, trialability

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