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Satanic FeminismLucifer as the Liberator of Woman in Nineteenth-Century Culture$
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Per Faxneld

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190664473

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190664473.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Introduction
Source:
Satanic Feminism
Author(s):

Per Faxneld

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190664473.003.0001

Chapter 1 presents the purpose of the study: to map, contextualize, and discuss the discourse of more or less explicit Satanic feminism as it is conveyed in a number of esoteric works, literary texts, autobiographies, scholarly books, political and polemical publications, newspaper reviews, editorials and articles, early works of cinema, paintings, sculptures, and even artefacts of consumer culture such as jewellery. The time period under scrutiny stretches from 1772 to the years before World War II. The great majority of sources, however, belong to the period ca. 1880–1910. Theoretical points of departure are explained, drawing on Michel Foucault, Julia Kristeva, and Bruce Lincoln. In this chapter, key terms like counter-discourse, counter-myth, esotericism, occultism, and Satanism are also defined.

Keywords:   Satanic, Satanism, feminism, esotericism, definitions, counter-myth, counter-discourse, nineteenth century

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