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Cityscapes of Violence in KarachiPublics and Counterpublics$
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Nichola Khan

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190656546

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190656546.001.0001

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1994

1994

Political Madness, Ethics, and Story-making in Liaquatabad district in Karachi

Chapter:
(p.41) 2 1994
Source:
Cityscapes of Violence in Karachi
Author(s):

Nichola Khan

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190656546.003.0003

This chapter by Nichola Khan revisits a complicated relationship she formed with a key interlocutor and self-identified MQM mercenary belonging to Karachi’s Muttahida Quami Movement party (MQM), whom she calls ‘Arshad’. Drawing ethnographic reflections from one year, 1994, and from a longer period Khan spent living in Liaquatabad in the nineties, this chapter troubles the metaphor of madness in order to query ways violence raises existential questions about humanity; to question ways writers channel their own feelings into analyses of violence; and the inevitable partiality and incompleteness of these framings. It also highlights ways commentaries of violence produce a frenzy of fascination and collusion around atrocities they supposedly protest. The single life story is provocative insofar as it does not require cultural interpretation to render experience sensible. It reminds us as human beings to resist violence, whilst raising dilemmas concerning how to represent those who have committed atrocious acts, and about whether even the ‘worst’ cases offer possibilities for positive change.

Keywords:   MQM, ethnography, madness, writing about violence, representation, politics of writing, Liaquatabad

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