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Robot Ethics 2.0From Autonomous Cars to Artificial Intelligence$
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Patrick Lin, Keith Abney, and Ryan Jenkins

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190652951

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190652951.001.0001

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Pediatric Robotics and Ethics

Pediatric Robotics and Ethics

The Robot Is Ready to See You Now, but Should It Be Trusted?

Chapter:
(p.127) 9 Pediatric Robotics and Ethics
Source:
Robot Ethics 2.0
Author(s):

Jason Borenstein

Ayanna Howard

Alan R. Wagner

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190652951.003.0009

As robots leave the lab and are deployed in hospital or other healthcare settings, the community of users may become overreliant on and overtrust such technology. Thus, there is a pressing need to examine the tendency to overtrust and develop strategies to mitigate the risk to children, parents, and healthcare providers that could occur due to an overreliance on pediatric robotics. To overcome this challenge, we seek to consider the broad range of ethical issues related to the use of robots in pediatric healthcare. This chapter provides an overview of the current state of the art in pediatric robotics, describes relevant ethical issues, and examines the role that overtrust plays in these scenarios. We conclude with suggested strategies to mitigate the relevant risks and describe a framework for the future deployment of robots in the pediatric domain.

Keywords:   robots, autonomous systems, ethics, overtrust, pediatrics, risk, developmental disabilities, occupational therapy, user complacency, positivity bias

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