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Robot Ethics 2.0From Autonomous Cars to Artificial Intelligence$
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Patrick Lin, Keith Abney, and Ryan Jenkins

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190652951

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190652951.001.0001

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Military Robots and the Likelihood of Armed Combat

Military Robots and the Likelihood of Armed Combat

Chapter:
(p.274) 18 Military Robots and the Likelihood of Armed Combat
Source:
Robot Ethics 2.0
Author(s):

Leonard Kahn

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190652951.003.0018

I explore the questions of whether the use of military robots will lead to an increase in armed conflict and whether this increase would be a morally bad thing. I argue that the answer to both questions is positive, and, along the way, I flesh out the idea of what military robots are and what functions they might have, as well as how the impersonal forces of technological development can affect the choices of rational political agents. I conclude with some suggestions about how we might make the best of what is likely to be a bad business through the establishment of new international norms.

Keywords:   robots, autonomous, ethics, morality, military, armed conflict, war, loss aversion, price, cost, just war theory, jus ad bellum, jus in bello

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