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Next in LineLowered Care Expectations in the Age of Retail- and Value-Based Health$
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Timothy J. Hoff

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780190626341

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190626341.001.0001

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Ceding Care to the Corporation

Ceding Care to the Corporation

Making Doctors Disappear

Chapter:
(p.136) Chapter 6 Ceding Care to the Corporation
Source:
Next in Line
Author(s):

Timothy J. Hoff

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190626341.003.0006

The forces impacting the doctor-patient relationship cede many care responsibilities from the individual primary care physician to the health care organization. Many physicians are now salaried employees of these organizations and report feeling a great deal of pressure from having to embrace population health management approaches that involve heavy use of quality metrics and care standardization. Aided by lowered expectations of their interactions with physicians, patient loyalties begin to shift toward the organization rather than any single doctor, as patients describe their lowered expectations and how these create opportunity to place their faith in a presumed ability by the organization to provide them with satisfactory care. This dynamic further undermines the dyadic bond potential between doctor and patient, and provides additional rationales for health care organizations to introduce retail tactics into their own interactions with patients, designed to build brand loyalty and meet more basic patient needs, such as convenience, in standardized ways.

Keywords:   population health management, corporatized care, clinical work transfer, metric fever, patient expectations, patient-organization trust

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