Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
More than Meets the EyeWhat Blindness Brings to Art$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Georgina Kleege

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780190604356

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2017

DOI: 10.1093/oso/9780190604356.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 14 November 2018

What They Talk About When They Talk About Art

What They Talk About When They Talk About Art

Chapter:
(p.109) 8 What They Talk About When They Talk About Art
Source:
More than Meets the Eye
Author(s):

Georgina Kleege

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190604356.003.0009

This chapter will explore the possibilities and pitfalls involved in verbal description of art for a blind audience. Since the vast majority of any museum’s holdings cannot be touched, access programs for the blind rely on verbal description of painting, drawing, prints, photography, and the majority of sculpture. But is it possible to put a picture into words, and will those words be meaningful to someone who cannot see? This chapter provides a close reading of the audio tours at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, comparing tracks for mainstream auditors to those created for blind people and children. I include recommendations from blind artists on how best to describe art.

Keywords:   blindness, audio description, verbal imaging, MOMA, Alice Wingwall, David Johnson, Carmen Papalia

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .