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Devouring Japan
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Devouring Japan: Global Perspectives on Japanese Culinary Identity

Nancy K. Stalker

Abstract

In recent years, Japan’s cuisine, or washoku, has been eclipsing that of France as the world’s most desirable food. UNESCO recognized washoku as an intangible cultural treasure in 2013, and Tokyo boasts more Michelin-starred restaurants than Paris and New York combined. Together with anime, pop music, fashion, and cute goods, cuisine is part of the “Cool Japan” brand that promotes the country as a new kind of cultural superpower. This book offers insights into many different aspects of Japanese culinary history and practice, from the evolution and characteristics of particular foodstuffs, to t ... More

Keywords: washoku, Tokyo cool, Japan, food, food history, Japanese cuisine, Japanese identity

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2018 Print ISBN-13: 9780190240400
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2018 DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190240400.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Nancy K. Stalker, editor
Soshitsu Sen XV Distinguished Professor of Traditional Japanese Culture and History, University of Hawai'i at Manoa

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Contents

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Introduction

Nancy K. Stalker

Part I Japan’s Culinary Brands and Identities

Historical Culinary Identities

3 Soba, Edo Style

Lorie Brau

Culinary Nationalism and Branding

5 Washoku, Far and Near

Theodore C. Bestor

7 Rosanjin

Nancy K. Stalker

Regional and International Variations

8 Savoring the Kyoto Brand

Greg de St. Maurice

9 Love! Spam

Mire Koikari

10 Nikkei Cuisine

Ayumi Takenaka

Part II Japan’s Food-Related Values

Food and Individual Identity

11 Miso Mama

Amanda C. Seaman

12 Better Than Sex?

J. Keith Vincent

13 The Devouring Empire

Noriko J. Horiguchi

Food Anxieties

14 Eating amid Affluence

Bruce Suttmeier

16 Discarding Cultures

Eiko Maruko Siniawer

Afterword

Eric C. Rath

End Matter