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Object Lessons
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Object Lessons: How Nineteenth-Century Americans Learned to Make Sense of the Material World

Sarah Anne Carter

Abstract

Object Lessons: How Nineteenth-Century Americans Learned to Make Sense of the Material World examines the ways material things—objects and pictures—were used to reason about moral issues, the differences between reality and representation, race, citizenship, and capitalism in the nineteenth-century United States. For modern scholars, an “object lesson” is simply a timeworn metaphor used to describe any sort of reasoning from concrete to abstract. But in the 1860s, object lessons were classroom exercises popular across the United States. Object lessons forced children to learn about the world t ... More

Keywords: American Studies, material culture, history of education, visual culture, object lessons, object-based pedagogy, race, capitalism, childhood, history of ideas

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2018 Print ISBN-13: 9780190225032
Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2018 DOI:10.1093/oso/9780190225032.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Sarah Anne Carter, author
curator and director of research, Chipstone Foundation