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Vernacular EloquenceWhat Speech Can Bring to Writing$
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Peter Elbow

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199782505

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199782505.001.0001

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Revising by Reading Aloud

Revising by Reading Aloud

What the Mouth and Ear Know

Chapter:
(p.219) 11 Revising by Reading Aloud
Source:
Vernacular Eloquence
Author(s):

Peter Elbow

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199782505.003.0011

This chapter explores the importance of reading aloud as a technique for improving revision and looks at some concrete practical workshop activities for teaching the practice. It then considers occasions for reading aloud using all stages of the writing process, along with the practice of revising longer passages and whole essays by speaking and listening. It also explains how reading aloud relates to ordinary speaking and to the contrast between body and mind before presenting examples of problems in which reading aloud can be applied. The chapter concludes with a story on the origin of syllabaries by citing the invention of a Native American Cherokee named Sequoyah in Arkansas in 1820.

Keywords:   reading aloud, revision, writing, passages, essays, speaking, listening, syllabaries, Arkansas

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