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Donald Burrows

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199737369

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199737369.001.0001

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The Oratorio Composer I

The Oratorio Composer I

Dublin and London, 1741–5

Chapter:
(p.339) Chapter Eleven The Oratorio Composer I
Source:
Handel
Author(s):

Donald Burrows

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199737369.003.0011

This chapter discusses George Frideric Handel's visit to Dublin at the request of patron Charles Jennens, who wrote the libretti for Messiah for Handel to perform for charity. It then describes the success of Handel's performances which led to the King extending his stay. With the extension, the Messiah was performed on 10 April of 1742 at the New Musick Hall and received critical acclaim. Handel then left for London on 13 August 1742 and on the following year, on 23 March 1743, Handel performed Messiah in London where he received a cold reception, which was a stark contrast from Dublin. The rest of 1743, and up to 1745, proved to be difficult as Handel saw his audiences drop significantly, and after April, he never again performed in the King's Theatre.

Keywords:   George Frideric Handel, Dublin, Charles Jennens, libretti, Messiah, New Musick Hall, London, King's Theatre

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