Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Economies of Hellenistic Societies, Third to First Centuries BC$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Zosia Archibald, John K. Davies, and Vincent Gabrielsen

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199587926

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199587926.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 24 June 2018

Mobility and Innovation in Hellenistic Economies

Mobility and Innovation in Hellenistic Economies

The Causes and Consequences of Human Traffic

Chapter:
(p.42) 3 Mobility and Innovation in Hellenistic Economies
Source:
The Economies of Hellenistic Societies, Third to First Centuries BC
Author(s):

Zosia H. Archibald

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199587926.003.0003

This chapter examines mobility in the eastern Mediterranean area in the final three centuries BC. It argues that mobility and innovation were connected, albeit indirectly, in the Hellenistic world and that comparative examples of innovation from other periods and places can enhance the understanding of how this may have occurred. It discusses movements of military manpower and contemporary patterns of mobility. It presents a case study of the movement of craftsmen in Greek sanctuaries, and considers the nature of incentives to leave the homelands. It also discusses how the science of social networks provides a method for understanding the complexity of social structures in Hellenistic states.

Keywords:   Hellenistic period, mobility, innovation, eastern Mediterranean, social networks

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .