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The Oxford Critical and Cultural History of Modernist MagazinesVolume II: North America 1894-1960$
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Peter Brooker and Andrew Thacker

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199545810

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199545810.001.0001

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Making Modernism Safe for Democracy

Making Modernism Safe for Democracy

The Dial (1920–9)

Chapter:
(p.85) 3 Making Modernism Safe for Democracy
Source:
The Oxford Critical and Cultural History of Modernist Magazines
Author(s):

Christina Britzolakis

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199545810.003.0005

This chapter discusses the history of the modernist magazine The Dial. The magazine was established in the immediate aftermath of the Great War, and its final issue was published in July 1929. It is therefore associated with the moment of modernism's consolidation rather than its initial impulse. It also wielded influence as an international forum for the dissemination and discussion of modernism in the 1920s. The Dial enabled writers such as T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Marianne Moore, William Carlos Williams, D. H. Lawrence, Hart Crane, Wallace Stevens, and others achieve recognition as leaders of the ‘modern movement’, and underwrote the claims of the ‘movement’ itself.

Keywords:   American magazine, periodical, modernist magazine, T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Marianne Moore, William Carlos Williams, D. H. Lawrence, Hart Crane, Wallace Stevens

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