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Knowledge and CoordinationA Liberal Interpretation$
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Daniel B. Klein

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199355327

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199355327.001.0001

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Let’s Be Pluralist on Entrepreneurship

Let’s Be Pluralist on Entrepreneurship

Chapter:
(p.131) Chapter 9 Let’s Be Pluralist on Entrepreneurship
Source:
Knowledge and Coordination
Author(s):

Francis Green

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199355327.003.0009

This chapter discusses how several interpretations of entrepreneurship associated with Joseph Schumpeter, Frank Knight, Ludwig von Mises, Israel Kirzner, Arjo Klamer, and Deirdre McCloskey all relate to one another. Several authors have criticized Israel Kirzner for arguing that entrepreneurship is merely the noticing of opportunities “out there” waiting to be discovered. Some of the authors prefer to emphasize, such as Joseph Schumpeter, the creative aspect of entrepreneurship. Kirzner theorizes the opportunity’s existence prior to discovery, while Schumpeter is more inclined to say that the entrepreneur creates something that lacked prior existence.

Keywords:   entrepreneurship, Joseph Schumpeter, Frank Knight, Ludwig von Mises, Israel Kirzner, Arjo Klamer, Deirdre McCloskey

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