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The Oxford History of Popular Print CultureVolume Six: US Popular Print Culture 1860-1920$
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Christine Bold

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199234066

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199234066.001.0001

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Story Papers

Story Papers

Chapter:
(p.43) Chapter 2 Story Papers
Source:
The Oxford History of Popular Print Culture
Author(s):

Lori Merish

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199234066.003.0003

This chapter focuses on the history of story papers in the United States and their critical reception, with particular emphasis on their significance for working women and the latter’s place as characters within this literature. Citing Louisa May Alcott’s work of fiction Little Women, it considers the moral aspects of ‘bad books’ and the danger they posed to young women. It also examines the professional opportunities that story papers afforded women writers such as Alcott and Laura Jean Libbey, along with the importance of story papers for working-class female readers. The chapter concludes by discussing story papers within the contexts of social subjectivity and modern urban life.

Keywords:   story papers, working women, Louisa May Alcott, Little Women, bad books, young women, women writers, Laura Jean Libbey, social subjectivity, urban life

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