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Preachin' the BluesThe Life and Times of Son House$
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Daniel Beaumont

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780195395570

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780195395570.001.0001

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Dry Spell Blues

Dry Spell Blues

The 1930s

Chapter:
(p.75) Chapter 5 Dry Spell Blues
Source:
Preachin' the Blues
Author(s):

Daniel Beaumont

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780195395570.003.0005

This chapter describes the events of the 1930s, particularly the time of the Great Depression, which coincided with Son House's post-recording career. His day job at this point was in the farming industry, working on the Tate, Cox, and Harbart plantations. At the same time he continued playing gigs with Willie Brown on the side. Charley Patton was by then living in Holly Ridge where House and Brown would frequently visit him, leading to a romantic liaison with House and Patton's daughter China Lou. Prompted by the modest sums and hazards of performing at juke joints, House then sought out his third job—preaching. His career as a preacher lasted about seventeen years, and for the most part during this time, he struggled to live the life of a preacher. He then married Evie Goff following Patton's death in 1934. He remained married to Evie for the rest of his life.

Keywords:   1930s, Great Depression, Son House, Willie Brown, Charley Patton, juke joints, preaching

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