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On the Art of Singing$
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Richard Miller

Print publication date: 1996

Print ISBN-13: 9780195098259

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780195098259.001.0001

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On the Invasion of Vocal Pedagogy by Science

On the Invasion of Vocal Pedagogy by Science

Chapter:
(p.222) 71 On the Invasion of Vocal Pedagogy by Science
Source:
On the Art of Singing
Author(s):

Richard Miller

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780195098259.003.0071

This chapter comments on the idea that science has made undesirable inroads into the domain of vocal pedagogy in recent years, and that the voice teacher should not be concerned with physical and acoustic matters. Avoidance of information regarding the physical aspect of singing remains the hallmark of some outmoded voice teaching. There is no doubt that people sing professionally by a variety of techniques. However, this does not mean that a successful singing technique can be based on breath management, laryngeal action, and resonation that run patently contrary to the known facts of function. The voice teacher should know the literature on vocal function and the acoustics of the singing voice just as the medical doctor needs to know the literature of diagnosis and treatment.

Keywords:   science, vocal pedagogy, voice teacher, singing, voice teaching, singing technique, breath management, vocal function, acoustics, singing voice

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