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Caring for a LivingMigrant Women, Aging Citizens, and Italian Families$
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Francesca Degiuli

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780199989010

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199989010.001.0001

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The Shaping of New Subjects

The Shaping of New Subjects

Chapter:
(p.77) 5 The Shaping of New Subjects
Source:
Caring for a Living
Author(s):

Francesca Degiuli

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199989010.003.0005

Chapter 5 analyzes how im/migrant women coming to Italy from all corners of the world and from very different backgrounds in terms of class, education, and work experience are transformed into home eldercare assistants. The chapter shows how this transformation happens at different levels: at the global level through the process of migration and at the local level through the constant struggle to gain legal status in the country of arrival, as well as in the encounter with the actual employers. Through this process im/migrant women from different social, cultural, and class backgrounds are first stripped of their individual identity to become an undifferentiated group, that of im/migrant women in need of work. This first transformation allows for a second one, enforced by employers, in which im/migrant women are then transformed into the ideal workers needed by Italian families according to idealized hierarchies of race/ethnicities, religion, age, familial status, and more.

Keywords:   immigration, the feminization of migration, gendered expectations, cultural discrimination, race/ethnic discrimination, immigration policies, global dynamics, hierarchies of labor

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