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Agency and Joint Attention$
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Janet Metcalfe and Herbert S. Terrace

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780199988341

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199988341.001.0001

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Understanding the Structure of Communicative Interactions in Infancy

Understanding the Structure of Communicative Interactions in Infancy

Chapter:
(p.165) 9 Understanding the Structure of Communicative Interactions in Infancy
Source:
Agency and Joint Attention
Author(s):

Athena Vouloumanos

Kristine H. Onishi

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199988341.003.0010

Human communication is varied and complex. Two (or more) agentive interlocutors who have a set of shared experiences can interact using specific and intentional behaviors (verbal, written, and gestural) that transfer information. How do we come to understand communicative acts over the course of development? This chapter outlines a framework for understanding some important components of communicative acts, highlighting the critical roles of joint attention and agency, and proposes that this framework can direct investigations into the developmental roots of understanding human communication.

Keywords:   human communication, interaction, communicative acts, attention, agency, development

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