Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Ethics of Captivity$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Lori Gruen

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199977994

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199977994.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 10 December 2017

Dignity, Captivity, and an Ethics of Sight

Dignity, Captivity, and an Ethics of Sight

Chapter:
(p.231) 14 Dignity, Captivity, and an Ethics of Sight
Source:
The Ethics of Captivity
Author(s):

Lori Gruen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199977994.003.0015

“Dignity” is notoriously hard to get a grasp on. Despite the ambiguities that attend to the concept of dignity, this chapter argues that dignity, understood as a relational concept requiring apt moral perception, can be applied to humans and other animals. After laying out what dignity is and what it means to respect dignity, this chapter explores the ways that constantly being subject to surveillance and control threatens dignity. Through an examination of conditions in two captive contexts, zoos and prisons, it is argued that dignity can only be promoted if in addition to being treated with respect, captives are able to escape and/or return the gaze of their captors.

Keywords:   animal dignity, mass incarceration, respect, prisons, zoos, moral perception, surveillance

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .